Research Ethics Beyond Respect, Beneficence and Justice

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Most human research protections professionals are familiar with the ethical principles of respect, beneficence, and justice as laid out in the Belmont Report and as codified in the US federal regulations governing research with human subjects. However, the domain of research ethics encompasses much more than these three principles, and engaging directly with the other important concepts can help research ethics professionals better understand and more thoughtfully fulfill their roles. This webinar looked beyond the Belmont principles to explore some of the additional ethical questions and concepts that come into play during the protocol review process, but are not well delineated or defined in the regulations.

Most human research protections professionals are familiar with the ethical principles of respect, beneficence, and justice as laid out in the Belmont Report and as codified in the US federal regulations governing research with human subjects.

However, the domain of research ethics encompasses much more than these three principles, and engaging directly with the other important concepts can help research ethics professionals better understand and more thoughtfully fulfill their roles.

This webinar looked beyond the Belmont principles to explore some of the additional ethical questions and concepts that come into play during the protocol review process, but are not well delineated or defined in the regulations.  More specifically, we explored why research with human subjects raises special, though not necessarily unique, ethical questions, as well as discuss the difference between ethics and compliance and why it is useful for those who review research to engage with ethical questions and concepts directly.  Additional topics for discussion included:

  • Informed Consent: The role of voluntariness, disclosure, and comprehension in genuinely informed consent, and how the requirement for informed consent embodies respect for persons
  • Undue influence: What constitutes undue influence, why it is a concern, and how it is distinct from coercion
  • Vulnerability: What it means to be vulnerable, which populations are considered vulnerable and why, and the ethically important differences between types of vulnerability

Who should attend?

This intermediate-level webinar was of interest to all those concerned with the ethical conduct of human subjects research, including research staff, as well as those working with HRPPs and institutional review IRBs.

Continuing Education

CIP Credit label Webinar participants holding the Certified IRB Professional (CIP®) credential may apply 1 continuing education credit towards CIP recertification.

Speakers

Elisa A. Hurley, PhD is the education director at Public Responsibility in Medicine and Research (PRIM&R). She oversees program development for PRIM&R’s existing educational programs, including two annual conferences, At Your Doorstep, webinars, one-day regional and preconference programs, and a new online Knowledge Center, and spearheads efforts to expand PRIM&R’s educational program portfolio. Dr. Hurley also serves on and manages PRIM&R’s public policy committee. Prior to arriving at PRIM&R in December 2010, Dr. Hurley was an assistant professor of philosophy at The University of Western Ontario, where her research and teaching focused on biomedical ethics, metaethics, and moral psychology. Elisa received a BA in philosophy from Brown University in 1996, a PhD in philosophy from Georgetown University in 2006, and held a Greenwall Fellowship in Bioethics and Health Policy at Georgetown University and the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health’s Berman Institute of Bioethics from 2006 to 2007.

Access

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